News

This Sunday! Birdie Brunch!

The first Sunday of every month we host Babu’s Birdie Bagel Brunch! Come visit us this Sunday, June 5 from 11am-2pm in the Sanctuary garden. Live music from Unkle Monkey Band! Humans $10, birdies eat free!

Parrot Confidential Announcement

Nature: Parrot Confidential premiering November 13, 2013

Nature Tells Tales When Parrot Confidential Airs Wednesday, November 13, 2013 on PBS

Owners and rescuers of the popular bird talk about the ups and downs of caring for these colorful characters and the impact of “Baretta”

Talk to enough owners of parrots about their experiences raising an African gray or yellow-naped Amazon and, while their stories may differ, there seems to be a consensus that not everyone is cut out for the task. Unlike dogs and cats, parrots have not been domesticated, they are still wild. This can have consequences, often unforeseen, for the continued care of parrots by their owners.

Unpredictable behavior or ear-shattering squawks, for example, can result in frustrated owners trying to find new homes for their highly intelligent birds, turning to already overcrowded shelters and sanctuaries for help, or in some cases, abandoning their pets.

From the wilds of Costa Rica to the suburbs of our own country, Nature explores the difficulties of raising parrots, why some breeders and owners become rescuers, and conservation efforts in the wild when Parrot Confidential airs Wednesday, November 13 at 8 p.m. (ET) on PBS (check local listings). After the broadcast, the episode will be available for online streaming at pbs.org/nature.

Parrots can reach the age of 80 to 90 years old, outliving many of their owners. Their intense need to form what for them is a mate bond with their human caregivers can lead to problems if the parameters of that close relationship change. The extended absence of a family member or the addition of a child to the household can tip the balance. Boston area residents, Liz and Russ Hartman, experienced first-hand how Basil, their yellow-naped Amazon, reacted after Russ returned from a long business trip. Basil had plucked all of the feathers off his chest, something he had never done before. “It was devastating to us because we didn’t know what was going on,” Russ explained. “We later determined he was so angry that he was willing to go through the pain of pulling his own feathers out. I think he was making a point. You have to be there for them. They are social animals.”

Jamie McLeod of the Santa Barbara Bird Sanctuary and a former breeder agrees that a parrot is “not just part of your life: they become your life.” McLeod says the average person keeps a bird two to four years, which creates a lot of unwanted parrots. “People come in,” McLeod continues, “and they’ll say, ‘I want a bird that talks, that’s quiet and that doesn’t bite,’ and that species has not yet been discovered.”

Some breeders, like Phoebe and Harry Linden, felt if they bred parrots, then not as many would be taken from the wild. They started the Santa Barbara Bird Farm around the time the TV series Baretta debuted, which featured actor Robert Blake and his medium sulfur-crested cockatoo that seemed like a cool pet. Demand increased overnight, but it wasn’t long before the Lindens heard about the subsequent rescues or surrenders of parrots to sanctuaries. That led to their decision to stop breeding parrots, care for the ones they had, and take back any bird they raised who needs a home.

Although Marc Johnson hadn’t planned to be a bird rescuer, once he purchased a blue and gold macaw to keep in his pottery studio, he kept getting asked if he would take in other people’s parrots. He and his wife Karen Windsor had to transform an abandoned chicken farm in Hope Valley, R.I. into a permanent sanctuary for unwanted parrots after the number of birds in their home grew to 300. They founded Foster Parrots, Ltd. which provides life-long care to over 500 displaced, captive birds with the help of a small staff and a squad of dedicated volunteers.

There are no sanctuaries for parrots in Michigan, so Marie Charon-Crowley takes unwanted birds into her home and cares for them as best she can. They are fed and watered three to four times a day, their cages cleaned; they need to be nurtured, not ignored. But being overlooked and damaged emotionally is what happened to Dolly, a Moluccan cockatoo, until Lavanya Michel adopted her when she was three years old. Lavanya and Dolly are inseparable, but human carers need regular breaks to see friends and run errands. That’s when Dolly happily greets gift shop visitors at the Santa Barbara Bird Sanctuary in the care of Lavanya’s friend Jamie McLeod.

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Parrot Confidential Announcement

Learning Center

Phase 1 of the Skylar Learning Center is nearly complete!

We are very pleased to announce that Phase one of the Skylar Learning Center nearly complete! We are currently working on the curriculum development and will be booking programs in the New Year.

Get more information on the Skylar Learning Center

View and print our Skylar Learning Center Brochure

Cocoa Pic NWM

Dedication of the Skylar Learning Center at SBBS

We are excited to announce the Dedication Ceremony of the Skylar Learning Center at the Santa Barbara Bird Sanctuary will take place Wednesday, June 19, 2013 from 4:30pm – 7:30pm.  Phase One of the project will be revealed and Skylar will be joining us for the dedication.  After a word from our sanctuary director, Jamie McLeod, and Skylar hors d’oeuvres and refreshments will be served.

 

How to prepare in case your parrot outlives you

While it is heartbreaking to lose a feathered friend there is always the very real possibility that our companion animals, especially birds, will outlive us!  The Santa Barbara Bird Sanctuary was fortunate to have Christopher C. Jones, a respected local estate planning lawyer, attend one of our board meeting in 2012 to educate us on the importance of planning for the possibility that our pet’s lifespan will exceed our own.  We learned about two very exciting options to make sure the pets we love so much are cared for after our passing.

Most people have a will or trust in place to deal with their property. What I was surprised to learn from Mr. Jones was that pets are considered “property.”  Every year about 500,000 pets go to various organizations due to the death or disability of their owner and ultimately half of those pets are put to death. Pet owners need a pet trust to protect their companions.  A personal trust costs an average of $2500 but Mr. Jones and his partners have created a cost effective, revisable solution for companion animals that can be created online, and covers all of the pets in a household, for only $89. You can find out more about these pet trusts at www.trustedpetpartners.com.

I knew right away I needed a trust for my Sun Conure, Scarlet.  He is a sweetheart to me, but loud and vicious to everyone else, and as such, would not be quickly placed in a new home in the event of my passing. I created a trust so I know there will be money to provide care for my friend while the best possible second home is found for him if he outlives me.  I partially funded my trust and can add more funding later which is a great feature.

The second way to help the feathered friends we all love so much is to include the Santa Barbara Bird Sanctuary in your planned giving.  It’s as easy as adding a line to your will or trust saying ‘I hereby bequeath (describe dollar amount, or property) to the Santa Barbara Bird Sanctuary, a nonprofit corporation, located at 2430 Lillie Avenue, Summerland CA 93067, for its general fund.’  At any given time there are over 60 birds being cared for in the sanctuary and funding and donations are always needed.  With your help the sanctuary will be able to continue to grow and fulfill its mission.

To learn more about creating a pet trust online visit www.trustedpetpartners.com and to learn more about how you can include the Santa Barbara Bird Sanctuary in your will or trust please stop by, or call or email us, for more information.

-Heather Dear

Palm Cockatoo

How to prepare a holiday meal with your parrot

Get up early in the morning & have a cup of coffee. It’s going to be a long day, so place your Parrot on a perch nearby to keep you company while you prepare the meal.

Remove Parrot from kitchen counter and return him to perch.

Prepare stuffing, and remove Parrot from edge of stuffing bowl and return him to perch.

Stuff turkey & place it in the roasting pan, and remove Parrot from edge of pan and return him to perch. Have another cup of coffee to steady your nerves.

Remove Parrot’s head from turkey cavity and return him to perch, and restuff the turkey.

Prepare relish tray, and remember to make twice as much so that you’ll have a regular size serving after the Parrot has eaten his fill. Remove Parrot from kitchen counter and return him to perch.

Prepare cranberry sauce, discard berries accidentally flung to the floor by Parrot.

Peel potatoes, remove Parrot from edge of potato bowl and return him to perch.

Arrange sweet potatoes in a pan & cover with brown sugar & mini marshmallows. Remove Parrot from edge of pan and return him to perch. Replace missing marshmallows.

Brew another pot of coffee. While it is brewing, clean up the torn filter. Pry coffee bean from Parrot’s beak. Have another cup of coffee & remove Parrot from kitchen counter and return him to perch.

When time to serve the meal:

Place roasted turkey on a large platter, and cover beak marks with strategically placed sprigs of parsley.

Put mashed potatoes into serving bowl, rewhip at last minute to conceal beak marks and claw prints.

Place pan of sweet potatoes on sideboard, forget presentation as there’s no way to hide the areas of missing marshmallows.

Put rolls in decorative basket, remove Parrot from side of basket and return him to perch.

Remove beaked rolls, serve what’s left.

Set a stick of butter out on the counter to soften — think better and return it to the refrigerator.

Wipe down counter to remove mashed potato claw tracks. Remove Parrot from kitchen counter and return him to perch.

Cut the pie into serving slices. Wipe whipped cream off Parrot’s beak and place large dollops of remaining whipped cream on pie slices.

Whole slices are then served to guests, beaked-out portions should be reserved for host & hostess.

Place Parrot inside cage & lock the door.

Sit down to a nice relaxing dinner with your family — accompanied by plaintive cries of “WANT DINNER!” from the other room.

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Halloween Goblins!

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A few days before Halloween we got a call from Rabobank in Carpinteria who had a huge pumpkin to donate to our feathered goblins. Parrots relish cooked squash and pumpkin so we thought that would help feed the flock for awhile. After picking up the monstrous pumpkin that weighed 135 pounds we decided to take the opportunity to carve it up…..hope your Halloween and Thanksgiving was as much fun as ours!

Thanks Rabobank!

Sanctuary Newsletter 11 02

Hilary Swank names SBBS as one of her favorite charities!

Check this out from People Magazine! Hilary named us as one of her favorite charities. Santa Barbara Bird Sanctuary loves Hilary and her silly grey “Seuss”!

Pet Trust

While it is heartbreaking to lose a feathered friend there is always the very real possibility that our companion animals, especially birds, will outlive us! The Santa Barbara Bird Sanctuary was fortunate to have Christopher C. Jones, a respected local estate planning lawyer, attend a recent board meeting to educate us on the importance of planning for the possibility that our pet’s lifespan will exceed our own. We learned about two very exciting options to make sure the pets we love so much are cared for after our passing.

Most people have a will or trust in place to deal with their property. What I was surprised to learn from Mr. Jones was that pets are considered property. Every year about 500,000 pets go to various organizations due to the death or disability of their owner and ultimately half of those pets are killed. Pet owners need a pet trust to protect their companions. A personal trust costs an average of $2500 but Mr. Jones and his partners have created a cost effective, revisable solution for companion animals that can be created online and covers all of the pets in a household for only $89.

I knew right away I needed a trust for my Sun Conure, Scarlet. He is a sweetheart to me, but loud and vicious to everyone else. I created a trust so I know there will be money to provide care for my friend while the best possible second home is found for him if something happens to me. I partially funded my trust and can add more funding later which is a great feature.

The second way to help the feathered friends we all love so much is to include the Santa Barbara Bird Sanctuary in your planned giving. It’s as easy as adding a line to your will or trust saying ‘I hereby bequeath (describe dollar amount, or property) to the Santa Barbara Bird Sanctuary, a nonprofit corporation, located at 2430 Lillie Avenue, Summerland CA 93067, for its general fund.’ At any given time there are over 60 birds being cared for in the Sanctuary, funding and donations are always needed. With your help the sanctuary will be able to continue to grow and fulfill its mission.

To learn more about creating a pet trust online visit www.trustedpetpartners.com and to learn more about how you can include the Santa Barbara Bird Sanctuary in your will or trust please stop by or call or email us for more information.

Heather Dear
SBBS Board of Directors

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Emergency Preparedness


Our current climate condition is ripe for disaster! As an owner of dogs, horses and birds, I keep emergency preparedness for all of them in the forefront of my planning. Appropriate crates (or trailers!), feed and water are critical parts of your evacuation plan. Do you know where you can quickly go, with your animals in an emergency? Phone service is often disabled so set a place to meet up with loved ones ahead of time. Check with your local Animal Services Agency and the Red Cross for current information about pets and shelters. Most shelters will not allow animals (except Service Animals), but do have arrangements with local agencies to care for your evacuated animal family.

And finally, when an evacuation notice is given, take heed! When you hear the words “Voluntary Evacuation”, it’s time for people with special needs, and those with animals to leave. By the time officials use the word “Mandatory,” the streets will be clogged with emergency responders and others that waited too long!

In Santa Barbara County, you can find more emergency preparedness information at: http://www.countyofsb.org/ceo/oes
In Ventura County, you can find more emergency preparedness information at: http://www.readyventuracounty.org/

And, as always, the Santa Barbara Bird Sanctuary stands ready to help!

Dale Carnathan
President

Emergency preparedness tip

Bag your cleaned carrier in a garbage bag. Inside the carrier you can store items that will be needed such as bottled water, dry and canned foods, as well as an emergency kit. in the event that you need to evacuate everything will be ready…..simply dump the supplies into the garbage bag, crate your bird and your good to go! If time allows other important belongings can be added to the garbage bag. In many cases you may only have minutes before you need to vacate, having to make choices about favorite pets or belongings is difficult, be prepared ahead of time!

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